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About Us
Believe Out Loud

Uniting Christianity and LGBTQ justice through an online network empowering Christians to work for LGBTQ equality.

Believe Out Loud (BOL) moves hearts and minds toward understanding and supportive action by shattering the false dichotomy between LGBTQ justice and Christianity. BOL is an online network that provides the awareness, education, information and discussion forum Christians need to promote lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer equality. Through daily blog posts and social media platforms, we equip Christians with the tools and resources to share their conviction for LGBTQ equality with others. 

Reaching an average of one million individuals per week, BOL is the leading platform for Christian affirmation for LGBTQ equality, making it possible for clergy, lay people, thought leaders and elected officials to publicly endorse LGBTQ equality from a Christian perspective. A Welcoming Church Map located on our website allows users to locate one of the more than 4,800 open and affirming churches across the country from a variety of denominations. 

Believe Out Loud also leads and participates in grassroots campaigns engaging our online community to take offline action in order to achieve LGBTQ equality. 

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Mr. Murray Sams, Jr. is an Army Veteran with six years of service. He joined in 1964 and was stationed in Munich, Germany where he was with the Fifth Battalion, 32nd Armory as a gunner and tank commander. But before his heroic service, the 74 year old was working as an orderly at Hillman Hospital in Alabama on a Sunday morning 55 years ago.

 

It was 10:22am September 15, 1963, when the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, AL was bombed. Many were hurt, but four little girls lost their lives while in Sunday School. Denise McNair was just 11 years old. Carole Robertson, Addie Mae Collins and Cynthia Wesley were 14 years old. That infamous church bombing was one of the most horrific of the Civil Rights Movement and Mr. Sams was there when the girls were brought into the hospital.

 

It was no surprise the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church was targeted. It had been a central meeting place for the burgeoning Civil Rights Movement. Following the terrorist attack, it continued as a historic strong hold in the fight for racial justice. Members of the KKK Cahaba Group were eventually convicted in the deadly bombing. Herman Cash was suspected, but died before being prosecuted. Robert Chambliss was convicted in November 1977, Thomas Blanton was convicted in 2000 and Bobby Cherry was ultimately convicted in May 2002.

 

Four little girls died that day 55 years ago, as did two other teenagers when fires and rioting broke out throughout the city of Birmingham. This violent church bombing was a costly, yet pivotal moment in the civil rights struggle.

Mr. Murray Sams, Jr. is an Army Veteran with six years of service. He joined in 1964 and was stationed in Munich, Germany where he was with...

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